Coston, St Andrew

The Church

The distinctive medieval church of St Andrew is Grade I listed, with the earliest feature a single round headed Norman lancet window with attractive tree motifs, dating from the C11th.

The historic interior has many fine medieval details including gargoyles, friezes, mask and angel corbels, C14th stained glass, sedilia and piscina, and a C15th font. The chancel includes the earliest Gothic Revival architecture in a Leicestershire church.

The tower and north aisle are Norman and the south aisle, thought to have been a potential foresters’ lodge chapel, is C14th.

The chancel was rebuilt and restored in 1846.

On the north wall of the chancel there is a most unusual and striking bronze memorial plaque to a rector's son who was accidentally killed while acting in a play. Inscribed in black with significant words initialised in red it reads: ‘Sacred to the memory of Temple E. Crozier aged 24 years who was accidentally stabbed on stage at the Novelty Theatre whilst playing. This tablet was subscribed for by some members of the profession as a small token of the high esteem in which he was held a faithful friend and thorough worker who died at his post. Aug 10th 1896 R.I.P. He will live in our memories for ever’.

 

The Bats

The south aisle is home to a sizeable maternity colony of Natterer's bats, which leave large quantities of droppings and urine staining scattered throughout the church. The resulting mess and smell have proved extremely challenging for this small rural church community.

Following bat surveys in 2020 bespoke shelves to catch droppings were installed under the main south aisle roost. These will reduce bat impacts inside the church without harming the colony.

The church held a successful bat night in July 2021 and is hosting training events for bat workers in 2022.

Upcoming events

If you’d like to contact or find out more about the church, visit their page on A Church Near You